May 2015

May 25
155H

About a year after undergrad/getting my first real job, I emailed my bosses and asked for a raise. I asked for a 33% raise and ended up with a 25% raise, so I didn’t do so bad. To put in context, I worked for a small company and took on a lot of key roles so I had some leverage in my request. Here’s a template for what I did if you’d like to give it a try:

I’ve been at COMPANY full time for almost 10 months now. Obviously, I love the job very much and enjoy seeing COMPANY grow and expand.

That being said, in the last 10 months, I have been an intricate part of developing and implementing plans for PROJECT, PROJECT, PROJECT, and countless other large and small clients. As these PROJECTS recur, I believe the experience I’ve gained will be essential to the development of these projects.

I feel that I have been able to exceed many of the expectations set forth upon me, while taking substantial burdens off of COLLEAGUE, COLLEAGUE, COLLEAGUE. In addition, in many companies my roles in part as a NAME OF PRIMARY ROLE, NAME OF ADDITIONAL ROLE, NAME OF ADDITIONAL ROLE and NAME OF ADDITIONAL ROLE are often separate jobs. Obviously, I understand the nature of our company and know it is necessary for people to fulfill many roles in order to be effective.

As I initially came on in an entry-level capacity (though having X years of experience in the INDUSTRY), a position did not initially exist for precedence. Due to no precedence and overt job description, it was difficult for me to properly assess a suitable and fair compensation for myself. As my job roles have come into fruition, I have taken into account similar jobs within the INDUSTRY.

With these things in mind, I think my compensation should reflect my work ethic, numerous roles, experience, and my current enrollment in an EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM. I am requesting a pay increase to $XX,XXX. While I know this is substantially more than my current salary of $XX,XXX, $XXK is the average salary for those with similar jobs in the METROPOLITAN AREA as well as significantly less than similar jobs at COMPETITIVE COMPANIES (obviously I’m taking into account their much larger client-base).

As I plan to remain in this position for some time, and there is no current means for a “promotion,” I feel an increase in my salary would suffice as a way to note my job roles that now involve dealing with JOB ROLE, JOB ROLE, JOB ROLE. I am also taking into account this pay raise would make my salary stagnant for some time.

If we’re not in position to allow for a pay raise, or if you feel my work is not up to this level of compensation, I am more than willing to hear alternative options, or recommendations for improvement. I would like for you to consider this proposal and speak with me about it whenever you have some time this week or next.

Comment to let me know how it goes or if you have any questions!

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May 24
13-06_accordionmenu[1]

Working with jQuery Accordions I ran into two issues that seemed to be simple but turned out to be a hassle since answers were all over the place from using Python to C++ to it can’t be done. So, after a lot of testing, I found a solution that worked for me for two jQuery accordion issues:

Automatically Have Accordion Open on a Page

I was designing a faculty page for work and really wanted it to open up to the first faculty member when someone arrived on the page. To accomplish this I took the standard jQuery for the accordion and added one additional line:
<script>
$( "#accordion" ).accordion({
heightStyle: "content",
active:false,
collapsible: true,
header:"div.accordionheader"
});
$("#accordion").accordion("option", "active", 0);
</script>

What this does is select the first accordion div to be opened on page load. Obviously, changing the 0 to a different number will edit what opens.

Assign IDs to automatically open an Accordion from an Outside Link

This was a bit more complicated to figure out but essentially what I wanted to do for work was to list out courses and upon clicking the link it navigated to an accordion style page that opened the correct corresponding accordion:

<script>
$( "#accordion" ).accordion({
heightStyle: "content",
active: false,
collapsible: true,
header:"div.accordionheader"
});
var hash = window.location.hash;
var anchor = $('a[href$="'+hash+'"]');
if (anchor.length > 0){
anchor.click();
}
</script>

Then also added to the accordion headers:

<div class="accordionheader">
<h4><a id="name" href="#name">Header Test</h4>
</div>

I found this trick via OpenStack and it got little recognition so I wanted to assert that it works.

(Image via sixrevisions.com)

May 24
7d67fc09c162cca20dca843cb7e4b16a6d11f986_2400x1800[1]

I went on vacation with my boyfriend and his parents to a nice timeshare right outside of the Vegas Strip. His mother found out there was an owner’s lounge with a great view of the strip that she wanted us to hang out at later that night. After we got back from our night out, the four of us grabbed some bowls or ice cream and headed up to the balcony to check out the view, we actually asked the girl at the front desk how to get up there.

About five minutes after we got up there, security came and informed us the room was actually supposed to close at 9 and asked us to leave since it was well after 9 and they needed to lock up. Before the security guards could even finish their statement, I grabbed my bowl and headed back inside. While I’m grabbing my bowl, my boyfriend’s mom starts arguing with the security guard, saying we’re just eating ice cream, and we’d be done in less than 15 minutes. The security guard replied that they were just doing their jobs and had to close up. I didn’t stick around for the end of the discussion.

Separately, my boyfriend and his dad both tried to get me to come back in while she continued arguing with the security guard. I refused. I know they had the best intentions, but as a black girl in America, the immediate response to an authority figure asking something of me is to comply quickly and peacefully, even in the company of three white people that I’m close with.

As I watch people that look like me get gunned down or locked up for loitering, trespassing, resisting arrest, or running from the cops, I watched the same situation unfolding and I wanted no part of it. My immediate feeling when the security guard arrived was not one of safety but of fear and the immediate instinct to remove myself from that situation.

After the security guards left and allowed them to remain, I still did not return to the balcony. As I sat in the lobby waiting for my boyfriend and his family to finish so many thoughts ran through my head: “What if they come back with reinforcements?” “What if we get kicked out of the hotel?” “What if some less understanding guards come back?” “What if they call the police?” “It’s their word against ours.”

Then I thought, what’s it like not to be afraid? What’s it like to freely question authority?

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not afraid of cops, security, or anyone trying to keep order all the time. I walk down the street greeting officers I pass without hesitation, but when put into even a slight gray area, I err far to the side of caution. I don’t speed. I don’t go where I’m not supposed to. I never touched a steering wheel until I was legally old enough and never had a sip of alcohol before my 21st birthday. I never wanted to give anyone an excuse to make me a statistic.

So, as I hear a middle-aged white woman stand up to a security guard in this nice Vegas hotel, when I see twenty-somethings walking around affluent neighborhoods with open containers, when I hear about crazy parties where the cops showed up, when someone tells me about the time they were doing 90 in a 65, when I hear all the innocuous rules people break on a regular basis, I hear courtroom charges, handcuffs, tasers, and bullets. I feel panic. I feel the need to flee. And they, the people that could very well be my family one day, don’t understand why.

A few days after all this took place, I heard a Ted Talk “How to raise a black son in America” by Clint Smith where he recalls being reprimanded by his father: “Son, I’m sorry, but you can’t act the same as your white friends. You can’t pretend to shoot guns. You can’t run around in the dark. You can’t hide behind anything other than your own teeth.”

Hearing this five minute talk made it clear to me, that I wasn’t the only one that felt this way, that I wasn’t the only one that didn’t hate authority but was always taught to fear it just in case.

(Image via ted.com)

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